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The Devastator founders Amanda Meadows and Geoffrey Golden

In Podcast, Writing & Publishing by Nerd For A Living

We talk with comedy writers Geoffrey Golden and Amanda Meadows, the founders of The Devastator. Formerly a bi-annual humor anthology, The Devastator is now an all-comedy publishing company producing new novels, comics, magazines, and activity books every month. We discuss the genesis of The Devastator, the reasoning behind their move away from anthologies to one-off publications, the challenges facing independent publishers in the Direct market, and much more.

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Kevin Mellon, Storyboard Artist for Archer and Comic Creator

In Comics, Podcast, TV & Film by Nerd For A Living

Kevin Mellon is a storyboard artist for Floyd County Productions, where he works on the hilarious animated spy comedy ARCHER, currently in its sixth season on FX. A graduate of the Kubert School, Kevin is also an accomplished comic artist. His work includes GEARHEAD and LOVESTRUCK with Dennis Hopeless, HEART with Blair Butler, and his own series, SUICIDE SISTERS.

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Forming a Comic Creator Group

In Articles by Adron Buske

Creating comics can be a solitary experience. The time required to pursue what most of us are doing as a hobby or ambition can exceed the 40-hour work week. How do you repel that quagmire of wasted time and keep the creative fires lit AND score some much needed social time? Get out and form a comic creator group.

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Josh Blaylock, Publisher and Founder of Devil’s Due Entertainment

In Comics, Podcast, Writing & Publishing by Nerd For A Living

We talk with serial entrepreneur, writer and comics artist Josh Blaylock, founder and publisher of Devil’s Due Entertainment. Devil’s Due currently publishes a number of creator-owned comic book titles, including Squarriors, Plume, Drafted, Solitary and Josh’s own Mercy Sparx. Josh also recently launched Blockhouse – his nerd-trepreneur incubator and umbrella for business endeavors outside and alongside comics.

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Indie Comics Roundtable with Rebecca Hicks and David Accampo

In Art, Comics, Misc, Podcast by Nerd For A Living

We talk with indie comic creators Rebecca Hicks (Little Vampires) and David Accampo (Sparrow & Crowe: The Demonaic of Los Angeles) about the craft of making and marketing comics, how to build and sustain a loyal audience, and how to carry over skills from your day jobs into your nerd passion projects. Networking and selling at San Diego Comic Con is a hot topic, and we veer all over the nerd culture landscape in this highly entertaining discussion.

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Andy Schmidt, Founder of Comics Experience

In Comics, Podcast, Writing & Publishing by Nerd For A Living

We talk with Andy Schmidt, owner of Comics Experience, the online school for comic creators. Andy is a former Senior Editor for IDW Publishing, and a former editor for Marvel Comics, where he worked on most of their notable properties. We discuss his path to working in comics, the creation of Comics Experience, benefits of a stay-at-home career, juggling different roles and businesses, and the power of having cool nerd jobs on your resume.

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‘How to be a Nerd for a Living’ panel from C2E2 2014

In Art, Business & Marketing, Comics, Live Panels, Misc, Podcast by Nerd For A Living

Recorded at Chicago’s C2E2 2014, this panel of nerd industry professionals discusses different types of jobs that exist within pop-culture. Each speaker talks about their career path, from education to on-the-job experience. Topics include small business start-up, the challenges of working for yourself versus corporations, networking and more. Panelists include Lorenzo Lizana (art director, Lion Forge comics), Andy Schmidt (owner, Comics Experience and Brand + Entertainment Solutions), Jaimie Cordero (CEO and art director, Espionage Cosmetics) and Pat Loika (Comixology, the Loikamania Podcast). Moderated by Nerd For A Living’s Wendy Buske.

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Protecting Artist Alley: The Tricky Business of Convention Art Sales

In Articles by Adron Buske

The comic book industry exists largely in a vacuum, playing by our own rules – and fast and loose even with those. Among them: the “blind eye” that publishers turn towards Artist Alley’s bustling commerce of non-licensed trademark exploitation. The dollars are generally too small, the usage too benevolent, to raise corporate eyebrows. Tradition says, as long as we avoid the rampant bootlegging of the hucksters, the Alley is healthy for our industry and its fans. Now, though, the game may be changing.